New Exhibition

David Burdeny – 10 Countries

February 8th – March 3rd, 2024

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 8th, 5-7pm

Liminal space is the theme for this new series. Featuring an array of nostalgic scenes, complete with colourful buildings, antique cars and idyllic cloud formations, each photograph seems like a postcard from the past.

“These images were collected slowly over the past few years  as singular events. Seen here, curated as  a whole,  they are evocative of a time long gone, a moment in history, places we imagine or imagine to be. I see them as part of the limen, thresholds between then and now which connect us to the basic human condition of ephemerality, the notion that nothing lasts forever.  Printed in large format, the scenes are a confection with infinite depth and layered vantage points that  invite the viewer to re-read them over time – questioning where you are and what you see.” – David Burdeny

Stephen Hutchings – The Forecast

February 8th – March 3rd, 2024

Opening Reception: Thursday, February 8th, 5-7pm and Saturday Feb 10th from 12-3pm

Jennifer Kostuik Gallery presents The Forecast by Stephen Hutchings.

“Weather is always on our mind. Especially when the weather is “bad”, or nasty or ominous, like a heavy rain, strong winds, storm clouds, and thunder or black skies. Then the weather becomes an inconvenience, perhaps a challenge or even a threat. The term “pathetic fallacy” is used in art and literature to describe weather that mirrors our inner state. The paintings in this body of work all denote a weather event that can be associated with an emotion or subjective response. They serve not only as forecasts of the weather, but also as metaphors of our human condition”. – Stephen Hutchings, 2023

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Spotlight


Publications

American Beauty: The Opulent Pre-Depression Architecture of Detroit Book by Philip Jarmain

American Beauty: The Opulent Pre-Depression Architecture of Detroit Book by Philip Jarmain

This book presents the photographic work of Canadian photographer Philip Jarmain. Since 2010 Jarmain has been documenting the increasingly rapid destruction of Detroit’s early twentieth-century buildings. His emphasis in this work is on the architecture itself of these vanishing edifices: the form and the detail. In Jarmain’s own words: “These are the last large format architectural photographs for many of these structures.” Fine art images depicting the interiors and exteriors of monumental public buildings of 1900-1910 comprise the content of this book.